The Real God Of Tsushima

Two storm that failed the Mongol to conquer Japan

L. Small

--

“Seven Samurai 3” by andy z is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

The Mongol invasions of Japan which took place in 1274 and 1281, were major military efforts undertaken by Kublai Khan of the Yuan dynasty to conquer the Japanese archipelago after the submission of the Korean kingdom of Goryeo to vassaldom. Ultimately a failure, the invasion attempts are of macro-historical importance because they set a limit on Mongol expansion and rank as nation-defining events in the history of Japan. The invasions are referred to in many works of fiction and are the earliest events for which the word kamikaze (“divine wind”) is widely used, originating in reference to the two typhoons faced by the Mongol fleets.

“Kublai Khan” by A. Omer Karamollaoglu is licensed under CC BY 2.0

The Mongol Empire

Kublai Khan became Emperor of China in 1259 and established his capital in Beijing in 1264 . Korea was then forced to submit to Mongol power. Two years later, he sent envoys to Japan to submit to the Mongol rule, or to face colonial rule. The second group of envoys was sent in 1268, returning empty-handed, as before. The two envoys met Chinzei Bugy, or Defense Commissioner for the West, who sent messages to the Shogun in Kamakura , and the Emperor in Kyoto. Some envoys were later sent, some through Korean envoys , and some by Mongol ambassadors. The Bakufu (Shogun government) ruled over all the fiefs in Kyushu (the area closest to Korea, and thus most likely to be attacked) to return to their colonies, and troops in Kyushu moved west, increasing control at landing points most likely. In addition, mass prayer services were organized, and many government jobs were set aside to deal with the crisis.

The Khan was willing to go to war as early as 1268 , but found that the Koreans did not have the resources to supply them with sufficient troops and navy at that time. He sent troops to Korea in 1273 , to act as front guards, but they failed to get enough food for themselves and their horses in rural areas of Korea, and had to return to China for supplies. The number of horses needed to support the Mongol army, and the necessary pasture to limit the movement of troops in barren areas where almost nothing…

--

--

L. Small

"One arrow alone can be easily broken but many arrows are indestructible" ~Genghis Khan~