History of the Origin and Naming of Mount Everest

Prior to receiving the name Everest, the mountain was known as Chomolungma in Tibet and Sagarmatha in Nepal. The British, meanwhile, referred to it as Peak XV.

L. Small
3 min readDec 16, 2022

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Photo by Kalle Kortelainen on Unsplash

Simply mention Mount Everest, and most people will recognize its location. Each year, a huge number of climbers from all over the world attempt to reach the summit of this peak due to its status as the mountain with the greatest altitude.

Geographically, this mountain is situated in the Himalayas, more specifically in the border region between Nepal and Tibet. From the south-east (Nepal) and the north (Tibet/China), the two main routes to the summit are from Nepal and Tibet/China, respectively.

Some contend that the ascent from Nepal is simpler. However, each route presents a unique set of obstacles, and climbers must still contend with acute mountain sickness (AMS), frostbite, and low oxygen pressure, among others.

Prior to receiving the name Everest, the mountain was known as Chomolungma in Tibet and Sagarmatha in Nepal. The British, meanwhile, referred to it as Peak XV.

Attempts to measure Mount Everest’s height

Over the past 150 years, experts have attempted to determine the precise height of this peak.

For this mountain’s official height, the Nepalese government has commissioned one study. The official record for the height of Mount Everest is 8,848 meters.

This height is acknowledged by both Nepal and China.

It was derived from a 1955 study undertaken by a team of Indian scientists. The Chinese also confirmed this height in 1975 when they conducted their own study. China once undertook a survey in 2005 to determine whether Mount Everest’s height had changed.

In this review, it was determined that the height of Mount Everest is 8844.43 meters when measured from a rock at the peak. Whether the height of Mount Everest should be measured in rock (8,844 m, China) or snow has created debate between Nepal and China (8,848 m, Nepal).

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L. Small

"One arrow alone can be easily broken but many arrows are indestructible" ~Genghis Khan~